Steve Creek Wildlife Photography: Blog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog en-us (C) Steve Creek screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) Thu, 19 Apr 2018 08:16:00 GMT Thu, 19 Apr 2018 08:16:00 GMT http://www.stevecreek.com/img/s/v-5/u878434194-o722419372-50.jpg Steve Creek Wildlife Photography: Blog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog 80 120 Great Blue Heron On Submerged Tree http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-on-submerged-tree I was able to photograph this Great Blue Heron while it was standing on a submerged tree. This was at the Sequoyah Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It has been awhile since I have been able to get a photo of one of these birds. I have been seeing them but they have been staying back in the flooded areas. It has been raining a lot which is creating lots of flooded areas for birds to catch frogs and crayfish. The Great Blue Herons seem to be extra skittish about my pickup when they are close to the road which is making it difficult to photograph these birds.

 

Great Blue Heron - 8226-180412Great Blue Heron - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds great blue herons oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-on-submerged-tree Thu, 19 Apr 2018 08:15:43 GMT
Box Turtle On Paved Tour Road http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/box-turtle-on-paved-tour-road I came across this Box Turtle on the paved part of the tour road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I could see it from a long distance and it wasn't moving. I'm not sure if it was enjoying the warmth of the sun on the asphalt road or if it was just resting. No other vehicles were in the area so I'm sure that didn't cause it to stop. It could have been an animal like a Coyote that caused it to stop. You can see that it is covered in sand so I am thinking it has not been out of the ground for very long.

I got a few photos of it and left it where it was. Most of the time I will move it from the road in a busy area. This is not a busy area and I was the only vehicle in this area for over an hour. Most of the vehicles I see in this area are other photographers and I trust that they are careful while driving in the refuge. I have been seeing people fishing at the refuge but they mostly stay on the other side of the refuge.

Here is a photo of a Turtle that I did move from a busy highway: Baby Snapping Turtle Rescued From Highway

 

Box Turtle - 8254-180412Box Turtle - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge turtles wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/box-turtle-on-paved-tour-road Tue, 17 Apr 2018 09:01:48 GMT
Great Egret With Crayfish http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-with-crayfish I photographed this Great Egret with a Crayfish while at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I posted a photo of this same Egret a couple of days ago with a frog (Great Egret Eating Frog). This Great Egret was hunting in a ditch on the tour road and it didn't seem to care that I was parked across the road from it.  Several people drove by and it continued to stay in the ditch near the road. These birds don't do this very often so I was lucky. I was able to spend several minutes photographing this Egret.

This area has been getting lots of rain the past few weeks and the roadside ditches have standing water in them. A large number of frogs and crayfish are in these ditches which are drawing in the wildlife to feed on them. I was surprised that I wasn't seeing Raccoons feeding in these areas. I'm sure they are at night and maybe I will see one on my next visit.

 

Great Egret With Crayfish - 8970-180412Great Egret With Crayfish - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals birds great egret oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-with-crayfish Sun, 15 Apr 2018 09:31:41 GMT
Great Egret Eating Frog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-eating-frog A Great Egret was catching and eating frogs yesterday next to the road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. This one didn't seem to care about the vehicles driving on the road. I was able to park across from it and take a bunch of photos. I saw it catch a couple of frogs and a few tadpoles. It was also able to catch a crayfish.

The refuge has been getting a lot of rain so these roadside ditches have water in them. The Frogs are using these areas and the Egrets are taking advantage of an easy meal.

This time of year is a great time to photograph Egrets and Great Blue Herons at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. I was able to photograph a few of the Great Blue Herons yesterday but they were not close to the road as the Egrets.

Here is this same Great Egret: Great Egret With Crayfish

 

Great Egret With Frog - 9576-180412Great Egret With Frog - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds egrets great egret great white egret oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-eating-frog Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:28:32 GMT
The Scissor-tailed Flycatchers Are Back http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/the-scissor-tailed-flycatchers-back I photographed several Scissor-tailed Flycatchers this morning at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It is good to see them back at the Refuge. I like to photograph them because they usually let you get close to them in a vehicle. They like staying near the tour road at the Refuge. 

They migrate through Texas and eastern Mexico to their winter non-breeding range, from southern Mexico to Panama. I do see some in March but I see more about this time of year.

 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 7973-180404Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma scissor-tailed flycatcher sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/the-scissor-tailed-flycatchers-back Wed, 04 Apr 2018 20:13:31 GMT
Baby Snapping Turtle Rescued From Highway http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/baby-snapping-turtle-rescued-from-highway Don't ask me how I was able to see this baby Snapping Turtle crossing a busy highway here in Arkansas because I have no idea. I was going to my Granddaughters birthday party when I spotted the Turtle in my lane. I was able to pull over onto the shoulder of the highway and run over and pick it up. I didn't see any water in the area but I read that it is common to find them traveling far from the nearest water source. I released it in a safe spot so hopefully, it will survive.

Snapping Turtle Facts

These turtles travel extensively over land to reach new habitats or to lay eggs. Pollution, habitat destruction, food scarcity, overcrowding, and other factors drive snappers to move; it is quite common to find them traveling far from the nearest water source. This species mates from April through November, with their peak laying season in June and July.

Females travel over land to find sandy soil in which to lay their eggs, often some distance from the water. After digging a hole, the female typically deposits 25 to 80 eggs each year, guiding them into the nest with her hind feet and covering them with sand for incubation and protection. Incubation time is temperature-dependent, ranging from 9 to 18 weeks. In cooler climates, hatchlings overwinter in the nest. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Baby Snapping Turtle - 1993-180331Baby Snapping Turtle - 1993-180331 Rescued From Highway - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas snapping turtle turtles http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/baby-snapping-turtle-rescued-from-highway Tue, 03 Apr 2018 08:40:28 GMT
Hiker Taking Selfie http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/hiker-taking-selfie I was at the Fort Smith Historic Site here in Arkansas last week when I saw this hiker taking a selfie. It is very rare that I will take a photo of humans while I am out photographing wildlife. I just thought this guy taking a selfie would be a cool looking photo.

I have a question for you! How do you feel about photographers taking photographs of strangers in public places without their consent? Photographing people and places in public is legal here in the United States.

In the USA, the protection of free speech is generally interpreted widely and can include photography.

For example, the case Nussenzweig v. DiCorcia established that taking, publishing and selling street photography (including street portraits) is legal, even without the consent of the person being portrayed, because photography is protected as free speech and art by the First Amendment.

Street Photography (photography conducted for art or inquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places.) is very popular.

Street photography can focus on people and their behavior in public, thereby also recording people's history. This motivation entails having also to navigate or negotiate changing expectations and laws of privacy, security and property. In this respect the street photographer is similar to social documentary photographers or photojournalists who also work in public places, but with the aim of capturing newsworthy events; any of these photographers' images may capture people and property visible within or from public places. The existence of services like Google Street View, recording public space on a massive scale, and the burgeoning trend of self-photography (selfies), further complicate ethical issues reflected in attitudes to street photography. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Hiker Taking Selfie - 7700-180331Hiker Taking Selfie - Fort Smith National Historic Site - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas fort smith historic site selfie street photography http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/hiker-taking-selfie Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:32:08 GMT
Barred Owl Drooping Wings http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/barred-owl-drooping-wings I photographed a Barred Owl yesterday at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. The Owl had its wings drooping trying to catch the first sunlight of the morning. It's not too often you catch a Barred Owl sunbathing. It has been raining in this area what seems like a long time. I was enjoying the sun myself yesterday.

Here is a good article on why birds sunbathe: Why do birds sunbathe?

This Barred Owl was located on the paved road leading to the Sandtown area. I have seen one at the beginning of this road for the past couple of years. This one didn't seem to care about vehicles in the area and I was able to spend several minutes with it.

The Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge has several pairs of Barred Owls. I have been able to get my best photos of these birds at this refuge.

 

Barred Owl - 7496-180330Barred Owl - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) barred owl birds oklahoma owls sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/barred-owl-drooping-wings Sat, 31 Mar 2018 09:06:08 GMT
Beaver Near Sandtown Trail http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/beaver-near-sandtown-trail I like walking the trail located near the Sandtown area of the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I have taken a lot of photos of wildlife while walking this trail. It is a paved trail so I can walk it quietly.

A pond is also located near the trail and a couple of Beavers have made a home there. This pond has thick brush between it and the trail and this makes it difficult to see and photograph any wildlife on this pond. This spring the Beavers have mashed some of the plants down making it easier to walk closer to the pond. They have created several paths to the water.

Early in the mornings I like going to this area and sitting near the pond. Sometimes I will get lucky and the Beavers will be outside the there lodge swimming or up on the bank.

Last week I was able to photograph a Beaver swimming the pond located near the Sandtown Trail. It walked up on the pond bank several times but I was unable to get a good photo because of the brush or the distance.

A few of the wildlife I have photographed near the Sandtown trail:

Western Slender Glass Lizard

Coyote

 

Beaver - 6954-180317North American Beaver- Swimming at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

 

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals beavers north american beavers oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/beaver-near-sandtown-trail Fri, 30 Mar 2018 07:57:30 GMT
Do You See The Turtle http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/do-you-see-the-turtle When you look at my first photo you will see that I was lucky to even see this Turtle. I spotted the Turtle on the edge of the road next to a field that had been plowed at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I would never have seen it if it hadn't of moved.

I sat on the edge of the road and was able to wait for this Turtle to start walking. It went back into the plowed field. It is time to start watching for them on the roads. I saw several more as I was driving yesterday.

I'm not sure what type of Turtle this is but I would guess some type of Mud Turtle.

The weather here in my area has been very warm. I think it got close to 80 degrees yesterday. I should start seeing lots of Turtles and Snakes.

 

Turtle - 7224-180324Turtle - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma

Turtle - 7180-180324Turtle- Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma

 

 

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge turtles wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/do-you-see-the-turtle Sun, 25 Mar 2018 09:50:52 GMT
American Robin Waiting For Water http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/american-robin-waiting-for-water The American Robin in this photo seems to be waiting for me to add water to the birdbath. I cleaned it the day before and I didn't add water because it was supposed to rain. The Robins are the main visitors to the birdbath I have in my yard.

I usually have a pair of American Robins that will build a nest in one of my pine trees. Sometimes I will get lucky and have two pairs. I have been watching a pair the past few days that I think are fixing to start building a nest.

Here is a photo I posted last week of an American Robin at the Fort Smith Historic Site: American Robin With Caterpillar

 

American Robin - 6898-180316American Robin - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) american robins arkansas birds http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/american-robin-waiting-for-water Tue, 20 Mar 2018 08:15:30 GMT
Fox Squirrel At Fort Smith National Historic Site http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/fox-squirrel-at-fort-smith-national-historic-site I like going to the Fort Smith National Historic Site here in Arkansas this time of year. The Fox Squirrels and birds are very active. I photographed a female Fox Squirrel a few days ago as she was making her rounds. This female appears to be close to having a litter of squirrels soon. I read that most births occur in mid-March and July.

 

Fox Squirrel - 6636-180309Fox Squirrel - Fort Smith National Historic Site - Arkansas  

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals arkansas fort smith historic site fox squirrels squirrels wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/fox-squirrel-at-fort-smith-national-historic-site Mon, 19 Mar 2018 10:09:40 GMT
Whitetail Doe Bedded In Brush http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-doe-bedded-in-brush I spotted a Whitetail Doe bedded near the road while I was driving through the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I stopped and got a few photos and the Doe looked my way but relaxed after a few seconds. She began grooming herself so I decided to stay and watch her for a few minutes. Another Doe was bedded nearby but the brush was to thick for a good photo.

The Whitetail Does were near the Bakers parking area. I usually see deer in this area and I posted a photo of a Buck a few days ago that was near this same area. (Whitetail Buck Still With Antlers

I was at the Sequoyah National Refuge yesterday and I noticed that the Farmers are discing most of the fields. They must be getting ready to plant this year's first crops.

 

Whitetail Doe Bedded In Brush - 6662-180312Whitetail Doe Bedded In Brush - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-doe-bedded-in-brush Sun, 18 Mar 2018 09:17:23 GMT
Bobcat Hiding In Cut Corn Field http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/bobcat-hiding-in-cut-corn-field A couple of days ago I spotted two Bobcats on one of the roads at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. One of the Bobcats was eating on something. When they saw my pickup they walked into a cut corn field. I parked an waited hoping they would come back into the open. About 10 minutes later they came out onto the road and sat down. They were both too far away for a photo. A few minutes later they walked back into the field. I drove to where they entered the field and saw one of the Bobcats walking into the brush on the edge of the old corn field away from the road. I began scanning the area for the other one and spotted it hiding in the cut corn field. I was able to get several photos of the Bobcat and then I left the area hoping they will remain in this area.

This is the exact same spot I photographed a Bobcat back in 2014 (Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge Bobcat). This spot is just past Miner's Cove heading north on the east side of the road. Miner's Cove is the area on the left when you turn right at 4 Corners.

This is also the same area I was seeing the Coyote Pups last August: Coyote Pup - Another Coyote Pup

 

Bobcat - 6855-180314Bobcat In An Old Cornfield - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals bobcat oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/bobcat-hiding-in-cut-corn-field Fri, 16 Mar 2018 09:36:01 GMT
Whitetail Buck Still With Antlers http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-buck-still-with-antlers The Whitetail Bucks that I have been seeing at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma have not shed their antlers yet. The past two weeks I have seen nine Bucks and they all had antlers. I did see one small Buck yesterday with only one side but I think that was all he had in the first place. I could see that the other side had not been shed.

The northern regions of the whitetails range experience shedding earlier than the Midwest. They will shed around January. The Midwest bucks tend to keep their antlers on until February, while the southern deer might still be rutting depending on the region, dropping their antlers anywhere from February to late March.

I photographed the below Whitetail Buck yesterday near the Bakers parking area (Bakers Field). He was with another small Buck that I mentioned above that had only one antler.

Here is a post I made four days ago of a couple of Whitetail Bucks in the water: Whitetail Bucks Wading Slough

 

Whitetail Buck RunningWhitetail Buck Running - 6797-180313 - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) bucks deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-buck-still-with-antlers Wed, 14 Mar 2018 09:32:05 GMT
American Robin With Caterpillar http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/american-robin-with-caterpillar Last week I was at the Fort Smith Historic Site here in Arkansas and I saw a large number of American Robins. They were picking up something in the leaves and it took me awhile to see what it was. The Robins were feeding on caterpillars. I was able to photograph one of the American Robins with one in its beak.

The American Robins will be gathering nesting materials very soon. It is one of the earliest bird species to lay eggs, beginning to breed shortly after returning to its summer range from its winter range.

The robin uses auditory, visual, olfactory and possibly vibrotactile cues to find prey, but vision is the predominant mode of prey detection. It is frequently seen running across lawns picking up earthworms, and its running and stopping behavior is a distinguishing characteristic. In addition to hunting visually, it also has the ability to hunt by hearing. Experiments have discovered that it can find worms underground by simply using its listening skills. It typically will take several short hops and then cock its head left, right or forward to detect movement of its prey. In urban areas, robins will gather in numbers soon after lawns are mowed or where sprinklers are in use. They also are attracted to freshly turned earth in gardens, where worms and grubs are abundant targets. Occasionally, they may visit bird feeders if mealworms or animal-fat suet is offered. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

American Robin With Caterpillar - 6539-180309American Robin With Caterpillar - Fort Smith National Historic Site - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) american robin arkansas birds fort smith historic site http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/american-robin-with-caterpillar Mon, 12 Mar 2018 08:09:01 GMT
Whitetail Bucks Wading Slough http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-bucks-wading-slough I got lucky on seeing these two Whitetail Bucks wading across this slough at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I say I was lucky but actually I took advantage of a couple of refuge employees. I was driving near the Reeves Boat Ramp when I saw a couple of refuge employees park and walk into the woods. I knew this area had lots of deer so I headed for the fishing pier located at the Reeves Boat Ramp. My hope was that these two employees would get the deer moving and that the deer would cross the slough to safety. By the time I got to the fishing pier I saw several Does already crossing and a few seconds later I saw these two Bucks crossing. It's great when a plan works. The only thing that could have been better would have been having the deer cross closer to where I was. The Refuge has gotten a lot of rain in the past few weeks and this sloughs water was high so they were crossing in a low spot.

Here is a photo of a Whitetail Buck I photographed toward the end of this month: Whitetail Buck Still With Antlers

 

Whitetail Bucks Water Crossing - 6296-180308Whitetail Bucks Crossing Slough - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals bucks deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-bucks-wading-slough Sat, 10 Mar 2018 10:08:58 GMT
March Coyotes http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/march-coyotes Reviewing my photos I notice that I am able to see and photograph lots of Coyotes during the month of March. I saw a nice large one at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge a couple of days ago but was unable to get a photo. We saw each other at the same time and it got into the brush before I could get my camera up.

Coyotes begin breeding in February, and their breeding season generally continues into March. I think this is one of the reasons I see so many in March at the Refuge. Another reason is that the farmers that grow crops on the Refuge use chicken litter as fertilizer. I notice this chicken litter will have some chicken feathers mixed in with it. I will see Coyotes in the open fields late in the morning sniffing around the areas where I see feathers. The chicken litter also draws opossums, raccoons, and birds and I think this also helps to bring out the Coyotes.

I am not sure if the farmers are using chicken litter at the Refuge this year. I'm not seeing any sign of it but I am seeing lots of Vultures on the ground in the open plowed fields.

 

Coyote - 030109-3-2Coyote- Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma  

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals coyote oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/march-coyotes Thu, 08 Mar 2018 09:38:53 GMT
Whitetail Doe In Overgrown Field http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-doe-in-overgrown-field I spotted this Whitetail Doe yesterday in an overgrown field while driving through the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I counted a total of five in this field. This field is located near the paved road that leads to the Sandtown parking area. This field always seems to have deer and it is a field that the refuge never mows and no crops are planted.

I saw several deer yesterday morning. Three were Bucks and only one of the Bucks had its antlers. (Whitetail Bucks shed their antlers during this time of year.) The deer I saw moved out of the open fields a short time after sunrise. Most of the fields at Sequoyah Wildlife Refuge have been plowed and I see a lot of green in these fields. Hopefully, the deer will start staying out longer during daylight hours since the Does will start having Fawns soon.

I did see one large Coyote about 9:00 a.m. on one of the roads. Most of the Ducks were gone. It was a very windy day with the winds gusting up to 50 mph. The high winds maybe another reason most of the deer were out of the fields early.

Something that did stand out yesterday was the large flocks of Vultures I was seeing in the fields. I couldn't see why they were on the ground. Sometimes the farmers use chicken litter to fertilize with and this will attract different types of wildlife. Hogs are also being shot and left but I didn't see any of them in the area of the Vultures.

 

Whitetail Doe - 6252-180306Whitetail Doe In an overgrown field - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals coyote deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/whitetail-doe-in-overgrown-field Wed, 07 Mar 2018 11:01:07 GMT
Fungus On Log http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/fungus-on-log Hiking through the Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas I see all types of tree fungus. I am not up on the different types but I read that without these strange and fascinating life forms, neither we nor the inhabitants of our native forests, would survive for long.

Whereas plants get their energy directly from the sun and atmosphere using photosynthesis, fungi get theirs by digesting living or dead organic matter, as animals do. Fungi obviously have no mouths or stomachs and instead, they work their way through or over their food, absorbing nutrients directly through their cell walls. Nutrients with simple molecules, such as sugars, can be absorbed fairly readily. Larger, more complex molecules, such as proteins, are harder to tackle, and the fungi must then make use of various enzymes (chemicals that help to dissolve and simplify the molecules) so that they are easier to absorb. (Source- Trees For Life)

I made the below photograph on a wet day back in February. 

February appears to be the wettest in Arkansas since at least 1939 and preliminarily the wettest February since state averages began being tabulated in 1895, according to the National Weather Service. (Arkansas Online)

 

Fungus -- 1978-180225Tree Fungus on a fallen dead tree in the Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas.

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas fungus nature ouachita national forest trees http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/fungus-on-log Mon, 05 Mar 2018 10:59:21 GMT