Steve Creek Wildlife Photography: Blog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog en-us (C) Steve Creek screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) Mon, 07 May 2018 08:43:00 GMT Mon, 07 May 2018 08:43:00 GMT http://www.stevecreek.com/img/s/v-5/u878434194-o722419372-50.jpg Steve Creek Wildlife Photography: Blog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog 80 120 Another Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/another-whitetail-buck-growing-new-antlers I came across another Whitetail Buck growing new antlers a few days ago at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. This Buck was near the same area where I photographed the one I posted here on my blog back on the 30th of April (Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers). This is in the Sandtown area where the paved section of the tour road is.

Antlers grow rapidly from their pedicle (base) while in velvet during the spring and summer, as fast as 3/4 inch/week for yearlings and 1 1/2 inches per week for adults during peak growth. Growth rate slows dramatically during late summer while mineralization of the antler is completed. The covering of the growing antler takes on the appearance of shiny velvet because sparse hairs grow straight out and are coated with oily secretions from the hair follicle. (Source: Mississippi State University)

 

Whitetail Buck - 1358-180427Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) antlers buck deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/another-whitetail-buck-growing-new-antlers Mon, 07 May 2018 08:42:45 GMT
Red-winged Blackbird Singing http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/red-winged-blackbird-singing When I drive around the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma the Red-winged Blackbird is one of the main birds I see and hear. You can get close to these birds if you remain in your vehicle.

I was able to get a closeup of this Red-winged Blackbird singing a few days ago. I was photographing a family of Geese when it flew a few feet from my pickup and began singing. 

The calls of the red-winged blackbird are a throaty check and a high slurred whistle, terrr-eeee. The male's song, accompanied by a display of his red shoulder patches, is a scratchy oak-a-lee, except that in many western birds, including bicolored blackbirds, it is ooPREEEEEom. The female also sings, typically a scolding chatter chit chit chit chit chit chit cheer teer teer teerr. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird - 1719-180428Red-winged Blackbird Singing - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma red-winged blackbirds sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/red-winged-blackbird-singing Sun, 06 May 2018 08:15:54 GMT
Tent Caterpillars Outside The Nest http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/tent-caterpillars-outside-nest I see a lot of the Eastern Tent Caterpillars tents while hiking the Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas during the spring. This year they don't seem to be as many.

The newly hatched caterpillars initiate the construction of a silk tent soon after emerging. They typically aggregate at the tent site throughout their larval stage, expanding the tent each day to accommodate their increasing size. Under field conditions, the caterpillars feed three times each day, just before dawn, at midafternoon, and in the evening after sunset. During each bout of feeding, the caterpillars emerge from the tent, add silk to the structure, move to distant feeding sites en masse, feed, and then return immediately to the tent where they rest until the next activity period. The exception to this feeding pattern occurs in the last instar, when the caterpillars feed only at night. The insect has six larval instars. At the last stage, the caterpillars disperse and each constructs a cocoon in a protected place. The adult moths, or imagoes, emerge about two weeks later. They are strictly nocturnal and start flying after nightfall, coming to rest within a few hours of dawn. Mating and oviposition typically occur on the day the moths emerge from their cocoons; the females die soon thereafter. (Source: Wikipedia)

The Eastern Tent Caterpillar is of some importance as a pest because it defoliates ornamental trees. Damaged trees, however, typically recover and refoliate within several weeks.

 

Tent Caterpillars After Hatching -1999-180421Tent Caterpillars After Hatching - Ouachita National Forest - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas caterpillars insects ouachita national forest http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/tent-caterpillars-outside-nest Thu, 03 May 2018 08:53:03 GMT
Barred Owl Wrapping Wings Around Itself http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/barred-owl-wrapping-wings A few mornings ago I spotted two Barred Owls close to the road. I was on the paved road in the Sandtown area of the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I didn't spot either of them until I had made the first pass through and was heading back out. I see a lot of deer in this area and have been photographing a Buck (Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers) that I have been seeing near this road. I guess I was looking for deer and missed seeing the two Barred Owls on my first pass through. Luckily I saw both as I was leaving the area.

The Owls were not together. One was near the river and the other was near the beginning of the paved road. I would guess they were several hundred yards apart. When I saw the first one I was able to park and photograph it for several minutes. It appeared to have seen something on the ground and flew further from the road to get a closer look. It watched the ground for several minutes but it went back to scanning the area. It wasn't in a good location for a photograph so I drove away. 

I came upon the second one and it was closer to the road. I decided to drive past it and park a short distance away for better light. It didn't seem to care I was around. Most of the time it was napping. After a few minutes, it wrapped its wings around itself which I thought made for a cool photo.

I was able to photograph this Barred Owl for a while until a truck drove by pulling a tractor. The Owl flew away.

Here is a photo I took back in March and I think it is the same Owl: Barred Owl Drooping Wings

 

Barred Owl - 0922-180426Barred Owl- Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma owls sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/barred-owl-wrapping-wings Wed, 02 May 2018 08:57:48 GMT
Whitetail Buck Running Through Water http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/whitetail-buck-running-through-water I was lucky to be able to photograph this Whitetail Buck running through the water. I had just pulled into the parking area for the Phillip Parks Memorial Fishing Pier located at Reeves Slough (Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge) when I saw two Bucks running through the water. I quickly got parked and got my camera ready just as the two Bucks were getting ready to exit the water. I then noticed two more Bucks entering the water at a run and I was able to capture the below photo.

I posted a photo last March of two Bucks wading in this same area (Whitetail Bucks Wading Slough). I have photographed lots of wildlife in this area of the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. Here is a Coyote I was able to photograph wading this same slough: Coyote Wading A Slough

 

Whitetail Buck Running Through Water - 1865-180428Whitetail Buck Running Through Water - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals bucks deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/5/whitetail-buck-running-through-water Tue, 01 May 2018 08:05:04 GMT
Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/whitetail-buck-growing-new-antlers I am seeing several Whitetail Bucks with new antler growth at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. Antlers begin to grow in late spring, covered with a highly vascularised tissue known as velvet (Wikipedia).

This Buck was with two other deer near the begining of the paved section of the tour road (Sandtown). They stepped off of the road and into the trees when I first drove by and I wasn't able to get any photos. After reaching the end of the paved road I came back by and the Deer were standing on the gravel section near Goss Slough. I was able to stop my pickup and get a few photos of the Buck.

When this Buck walked into the woods I noticed that it had a bad limp. I took several photos of its legs so that I could get a better look at them on my computer. I could see no visible signs of an injury. You can see in my photo of this Whitetail Buck that it has lost almost all of its winter coat.

 

- Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - OklahomaWhitetail Buck With New Antlers - 1376-180427Whitetail Buck Growing New Antlers

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) antlers deer oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge whitetail wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/whitetail-buck-growing-new-antlers Mon, 30 Apr 2018 08:33:01 GMT
Double-crested Cormorant With Catfish http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/double-crested-cormorant-with-catfish I photographed this Double-crested Cormorant a few days ago while it was catching Catfish. I was at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma near the Lower Scarborough which is just past Miner's Cove. I was able to watch it catch two catfish and they were both about the same size. It didn't seem to have any trouble swallowing the first one. The second one seemed to be more difficult and took longer. It kept dunking it under the water. It did leave the area after swallowing the second Catfish. I guess it was full.

I was able to get photos of this bird with the Catfish by waiting for this bird to get closer to my vehicle. When I first pulled up I saw it in the distance and it was working its way toward me. I didn't move and after waiting 45 minutes it came close and I was able to get some great photos. I felt like this bird was in a good place to catch something so I just waited longer and then it started catching the two Catfish.

 

Double-crested Cormorant With Catfish-1597-180428Double-crested Cormorant With Catfish - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/double-crested-cormorant-with-catfish Sun, 29 Apr 2018 19:25:58 GMT
Prothonotary Warbler http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/prothonotary-warbler I was parked in an area looking for a Cinnamon Raccoon that I had photographed earlier when this Prothonotary Warbler flew next to my vehicle. I was at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge where I do see these birds often. They like staying in the dense, woody areas near water which makes it difficult to photograph them.

The Prothonotary Warbler forages actively in low foliage, mainly for insects and snails. It is the only eastern warbler that nests in natural or artificial cavities, sometimes using old downy woodpecker holes. The male often builds several incomplete, unused nests in his territory; the female builds the real nest. It lays 3–7 eggs. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Prothonotary Warbler - 1186-180426Prothonotary Warbler - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge warblers wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/prothonotary-warbler Sat, 28 Apr 2018 09:22:35 GMT
Cinnamon Raccoon http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/cinnamon-raccoon I photographed this Cinnamon Raccoon yesterday at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It was walking on the side of the road heading to a pool of water. I was able to get a few quick photos before it disappeared into the thick brush. I did get a glimpse of it a few minutes later looking for food in the water.

This is my second time seeing a Raccoon this color. Last year I got a glimpse of one near this same location. I was unable to get a photo of it at that time and never saw it again. When I drive past this area I am always watching for it and it paid off this time.

I did some research in reference this Raccoons color but I didn't find much. People have posted a few photos of blonde and red Raccoons.

 

Cinnamon Raccoon- 1270-180426Cinnamon Raccoon - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

 

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals oklahoma raccoons sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/cinnamon-raccoon Fri, 27 Apr 2018 09:04:49 GMT
Eastern Kingbird http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/eastern-kingbird I photographed this Eastern Kingbird at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma yesterday. They are common in this refuge. I have tried for years to photograph one of these birds catching insects. They are very quick.

Eastern kingbirds wait on an open perch and fly out to catch insects in flight, sometimes hovering to pick food off vegetation. They also eat berries and fruit, mainly in their wintering areas.

 

Eastern Kingbird - 0708-180424Eastern Kingbird - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds eastern kingbird oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/eastern-kingbird Wed, 25 Apr 2018 08:55:58 GMT
Great Blue Heron Sunning http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-sunning I photographed a Great Blue Heron sunning itself on a cool morning last week at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It is neat how they droop their wings like this.

I have observed several different types of birds sunning. Mainly the Turkey and Black Vultures. I will see them basking in the morning before they leave the roost. Double-crested Cormorants are another bird I see sunning a lot.

Great Blue Herons sun different than these birds (besides the drooping of the wings). They face the sun.

I posted a video last year of a Great Blue Heron while it was Gular Fluttering on a hot summer day. It's not hot enough for this behavior yet but I thought I would still share this behavior on this post: Great Blue Heron Gular Fluttering

 

Great Blue Heron Sunning - 9995-180419Great Blue Heron Sunning - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds great blue herons oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-sunning Tue, 24 Apr 2018 09:15:32 GMT
Great Blue Heron On Submerged Tree http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-on-submerged-tree I was able to photograph this Great Blue Heron while it was standing on a submerged tree. This was at the Sequoyah Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It has been awhile since I have been able to get a photo of one of these birds. I have been seeing them but they have been staying back in the flooded areas. It has been raining a lot which is creating lots of flooded areas for birds to catch frogs and crayfish. The Great Blue Herons seem to be extra skittish about my pickup when they are close to the road which is making it difficult to photograph these birds.

 

Great Blue Heron - 8226-180412Great Blue Heron - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds great blue herons oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-blue-heron-on-submerged-tree Thu, 19 Apr 2018 08:15:43 GMT
Box Turtle On Paved Tour Road http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/box-turtle-on-paved-tour-road I came across this Box Turtle on the paved part of the tour road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I could see it from a long distance and it wasn't moving. I'm not sure if it was enjoying the warmth of the sun on the asphalt road or if it was just resting. No other vehicles were in the area so I'm sure that didn't cause it to stop. It could have been an animal like a Coyote that caused it to stop. You can see that it is covered in sand so I am thinking it has not been out of the ground for very long.

I got a few photos of it and left it where it was. Most of the time I will move it from the road in a busy area. This is not a busy area and I was the only vehicle in this area for over an hour. Most of the vehicles I see in this area are other photographers and I trust that they are careful while driving in the refuge. I have been seeing people fishing at the refuge but they mostly stay on the other side of the refuge.

Here is a photo of a Turtle that I did move from a busy highway: Baby Snapping Turtle Rescued From Highway

 

Box Turtle - 8254-180412Box Turtle - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge turtles wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/box-turtle-on-paved-tour-road Tue, 17 Apr 2018 09:01:48 GMT
Great Egret With Crayfish http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-with-crayfish I photographed this Great Egret with a Crayfish while at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I posted a photo of this same Egret a couple of days ago with a frog (Great Egret Eating Frog). This Great Egret was hunting in a ditch on the tour road and it didn't seem to care that I was parked across the road from it.  Several people drove by and it continued to stay in the ditch near the road. These birds don't do this very often so I was lucky. I was able to spend several minutes photographing this Egret.

This area has been getting lots of rain the past few weeks and the roadside ditches have standing water in them. A large number of frogs and crayfish are in these ditches which are drawing in the wildlife to feed on them. I was surprised that I wasn't seeing Raccoons feeding in these areas. I'm sure they are at night and maybe I will see one on my next visit.

 

Great Egret With Crayfish - 8970-180412Great Egret With Crayfish - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals birds great egret oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-with-crayfish Sun, 15 Apr 2018 09:31:41 GMT
Great Egret Eating Frog http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-eating-frog A Great Egret was catching and eating frogs yesterday next to the road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. This one didn't seem to care about the vehicles driving on the road. I was able to park across from it and take a bunch of photos. I saw it catch a couple of frogs and a few tadpoles. It was also able to catch a crayfish.

The refuge has been getting a lot of rain so these roadside ditches have water in them. The Frogs are using these areas and the Egrets are taking advantage of an easy meal.

This time of year is a great time to photograph Egrets and Great Blue Herons at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. I was able to photograph a few of the Great Blue Herons yesterday but they were not close to the road as the Egrets.

Here is this same Great Egret: Great Egret With Crayfish

 

Great Egret With Frog - 9576-180412Great Egret With Frog - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds egrets great egret great white egret oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/great-egret-eating-frog Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:28:32 GMT
The Scissor-tailed Flycatchers Are Back http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/the-scissor-tailed-flycatchers-back I photographed several Scissor-tailed Flycatchers this morning at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. It is good to see them back at the Refuge. I like to photograph them because they usually let you get close to them in a vehicle. They like staying near the tour road at the Refuge. 

They migrate through Texas and eastern Mexico to their winter non-breeding range, from southern Mexico to Panama. I do see some in March but I see more about this time of year.

 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 7973-180404Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) birds oklahoma scissor-tailed flycatcher sequoyah national wildlife refuge http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/the-scissor-tailed-flycatchers-back Wed, 04 Apr 2018 20:13:31 GMT
Baby Snapping Turtle Rescued From Highway http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/baby-snapping-turtle-rescued-from-highway Don't ask me how I was able to see this baby Snapping Turtle crossing a busy highway here in Arkansas because I have no idea. I was going to my Granddaughters birthday party when I spotted the Turtle in my lane. I was able to pull over onto the shoulder of the highway and run over and pick it up. I didn't see any water in the area but I read that it is common to find them traveling far from the nearest water source. I released it in a safe spot so hopefully, it will survive.

Snapping Turtle Facts

These turtles travel extensively over land to reach new habitats or to lay eggs. Pollution, habitat destruction, food scarcity, overcrowding, and other factors drive snappers to move; it is quite common to find them traveling far from the nearest water source. This species mates from April through November, with their peak laying season in June and July.

Females travel over land to find sandy soil in which to lay their eggs, often some distance from the water. After digging a hole, the female typically deposits 25 to 80 eggs each year, guiding them into the nest with her hind feet and covering them with sand for incubation and protection. Incubation time is temperature-dependent, ranging from 9 to 18 weeks. In cooler climates, hatchlings overwinter in the nest. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Baby Snapping Turtle - 1993-180331Baby Snapping Turtle - 1993-180331 Rescued From Highway - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas snapping turtle turtles http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/baby-snapping-turtle-rescued-from-highway Tue, 03 Apr 2018 08:40:28 GMT
Hiker Taking Selfie http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/hiker-taking-selfie I was at the Fort Smith Historic Site here in Arkansas last week when I saw this hiker taking a selfie. It is very rare that I will take a photo of humans while I am out photographing wildlife. I just thought this guy taking a selfie would be a cool looking photo.

I have a question for you! How do you feel about photographers taking photographs of strangers in public places without their consent? Photographing people and places in public is legal here in the United States.

In the USA, the protection of free speech is generally interpreted widely and can include photography.

For example, the case Nussenzweig v. DiCorcia established that taking, publishing and selling street photography (including street portraits) is legal, even without the consent of the person being portrayed, because photography is protected as free speech and art by the First Amendment.

Street Photography (photography conducted for art or inquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places.) is very popular.

Street photography can focus on people and their behavior in public, thereby also recording people's history. This motivation entails having also to navigate or negotiate changing expectations and laws of privacy, security and property. In this respect the street photographer is similar to social documentary photographers or photojournalists who also work in public places, but with the aim of capturing newsworthy events; any of these photographers' images may capture people and property visible within or from public places. The existence of services like Google Street View, recording public space on a massive scale, and the burgeoning trend of self-photography (selfies), further complicate ethical issues reflected in attitudes to street photography. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Hiker Taking Selfie - 7700-180331Hiker Taking Selfie - Fort Smith National Historic Site - Arkansas

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) arkansas fort smith historic site selfie street photography http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/4/hiker-taking-selfie Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:32:08 GMT
Barred Owl Drooping Wings http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/barred-owl-drooping-wings I photographed a Barred Owl yesterday at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. The Owl had its wings drooping trying to catch the first sunlight of the morning. It's not too often you catch a Barred Owl sunbathing. It has been raining in this area what seems like a long time. I was enjoying the sun myself yesterday.

Here is a good article on why birds sunbathe: Why do birds sunbathe?

This Barred Owl was located on the paved road leading to the Sandtown area. I have seen one at the beginning of this road for the past couple of years. This one didn't seem to care about vehicles in the area and I was able to spend several minutes with it.

The Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge has several pairs of Barred Owls. I have been able to get my best photos of these birds at this refuge.

 

Barred Owl - 7496-180330Barred Owl - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) barred owl birds oklahoma owls sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/barred-owl-drooping-wings Sat, 31 Mar 2018 09:06:08 GMT
Beaver Near Sandtown Trail http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/beaver-near-sandtown-trail I like walking the trail located near the Sandtown area of the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I have taken a lot of photos of wildlife while walking this trail. It is a paved trail so I can walk it quietly.

A pond is also located near the trail and a couple of Beavers have made a home there. This pond has thick brush between it and the trail and this makes it difficult to see and photograph any wildlife on this pond. This spring the Beavers have mashed some of the plants down making it easier to walk closer to the pond. They have created several paths to the water.

Early in the mornings I like going to this area and sitting near the pond. Sometimes I will get lucky and the Beavers will be outside the there lodge swimming or up on the bank.

Last week I was able to photograph a Beaver swimming the pond located near the Sandtown Trail. It walked up on the pond bank several times but I was unable to get a good photo because of the brush or the distance.

A few of the wildlife I have photographed near the Sandtown trail:

Western Slender Glass Lizard

Coyote

 

Beaver - 6954-180317North American Beaver- Swimming at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

 

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screek@gmail.com (Steve Creek Wildlife Photography) animals beavers north american beavers oklahoma sequoyah national wildlife refuge wildlife http://www.stevecreek.com/blog/2018/3/beaver-near-sandtown-trail Fri, 30 Mar 2018 07:57:30 GMT