Wild Hogs At The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge

June 24, 2017  •  1 Comment

I bet the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge manager is not happy to have wild Hogs on this refuge. Just about everywhere I hiked on the refuge I saw signs of Hogs. (March 2016)

I decided after seeing signs of Hogs that I would try to stalk up on one and get a photo. I rate wild Hogs right up there with deer and coyotes when it comes to being wary.

I found an area that had some fresh signs and I began my search. After about an hour I heard a few and I began my stalk. Most of the time you will hear a group of Hogs before you will see them. They squeal a lot at each other. As you can see in the above photos I was successful.

This one Hog kept looking at me while I was photographing it, but I don't think it knew what I was and it didn't pay me much attention after checking me out. Wild hogs can be extremely dangerous when injured or cornered.

 

Feral Pig Wichita Mountains Wildlife RefugeFeral Pig Wichita Mountains Wildlife RefugeFeral Pig At The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge In Oklahoma

Feral Pig Facts

 

A feral pig is a domestic pig that has escaped or been released into the wild, and is living more or less as a wild animal; or one that is descended from such animals.

Feral pigs are a growing problem in the U.S. and on the southern prairies in Canada. As of 2013, the estimated population of six million feral pigs causes billions of dollars in property damage every year in the U.S., both in wild and agricultural lands. Because pigs forage by rooting for their food under the ground with their snout and tusks, a sounder (group) of feral pigs can damage acres of planted fields in just a few nights. Because of the feral pigs omnivorous nature, it is a danger to both plants and animals endemic to the area it is invading. Game animals such as deer and turkeys and, more specifically, flora such as the Opuntia plant have been especially affected by the feral hogs aggressive competition for resources. For commercial pig farmers, great concern exists that some of the hogs could be a vector for swine fever to return to the U.S., which has been extinct in America since 1978. Feral pigs could also present an immediate threat to non-biosecure domestic pig facilities because of their likeliness to harbor and spread pathogens, particularly the protozoa Sarcocystis. (Wikipedia)

Comments

1.Greg Topp(non-registered)
In the state of Wisconsin, wild pigs are killed without bag limit when encountered. We have some in Sawyer County, Wi., but hunting tends to keep their numbers down. I don't think they can be totally eliminated.
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