Twin Whitetail Fawns Eating Together

August 14, 2017  •  1 Comment

I photographed these twin Whitetail Fawns eating together back in August of 2009 while at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. The deer do well at this refuge and you can see several twin fawns most years. My problem is trying to get photos of them together. I was lucky with this photo to be able to see them together and in the open. August is a great time to view the Fawns. The problem with photographing them is the corn, soybeans and other vegetation are high at the refuge so this makes it difficult to even see the deer. Sometimes I will even see triplets, but I haven't been able to get good enough photos of them yet.

I read that "White-tailed Does have a two-horned uterus which allows the bearing of twins quite easily. Each fetus gets its own room so to speak. No fighting and plenty of womb to move around"!

"Whitetail twins are of the fraternal variety. Does ovulate multiple eggs which are then fertilized by different sperm. So while all fawns look alike none of them are actually identical twins even if they do have the same mom. Whitetail twins have about a 20 to 25% chance of not even being fraternal twins! You can read more about this from an article written by Biologist, Jeannine Fleegle on the Penn State website.

In another article I read that "If a doe has twin fawns, she will hide them in different locations. The twins are usually within 25 feet of each other, but sometimes are as far apart as 250 feet." "Twins are typically reunited after three to four weeks".

Whitetail Twin Fawns - 080109-2Whitetail Twin Fawns - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma


Comments

Greg Topp(non-registered)
Steve,
Looks like you have a buck fawn at the left in this photo! We have so many fawns this year that putting them with the right doe is confusing!
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