Young Raccoons In Willow Tree

September 02, 2017  •  1 Comment

I almost missed seeing these two young Raccoons in this Willow tree. I saw them at a location called Miner's Cove at the Sequoyah Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. They were toward the back of the cove. The sun was just rising and it gave me enough light to see them and to get this photograph.

Miner's Cove is one of those places where photographers stop to check for wildlife because it usually has birds. At this time of year, it has very little water in the cove, but I continue to check it for Deer and Raccoons.

Both Raccoons began grooming each other after I parked and started photographing them. A little later they became sleepy and curled up around each other and went to sleep. I left this area and drove around the Refuge for about an hour and when I came back they were gone.

You will see lots of Raccoons while visiting the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. They are fun to watch and photograph. I have seen a lot of the adult Raccoons this time of year with young Raccoons following behind.

I read that Raccoons were thought to be solitary, but there is evidence that raccoons engage in a gender-specific social behavior. Related females often share a common area, while unrelated males live together in groups of up to four animals to maintain their positions against foreign males during the mating season, and other potential invaders.

After a gestation period of about 65 days, two to five young, known as "kits", are born in spring. The kits are subsequently raised by their mother until dispersal in late fall. (Source: Wikipedia)

 

Raccoons In A Willow Tree - 082117-3419Raccoons In A Willow Tree - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge - Oklahoma


Comments

Greg Topp(non-registered)
Steve,
Very nice photo! I like the way the colors play on this photo. Closer to "civilization", raccoons can be carriers of rabies and other diseases. In many cases, they have lost their fear of humans and one has to be careful if they are present. They come and go here and I have no problems because by dogs are leashed when they are outside.
Greg
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